NOTIFICATIONS FOR MOBILE

SCENARIO

There will be heavy fog in the area for the next 2 hours, possibly longer. The user’s flight to Chicago was cancelled. Their connecting flight in Los Angeles was not cancelled. They can book a new flight for free within the next 30 minutes because there are 4 seats left. They have to call an agent to book the flight.

30 characters for the first line 

40 characters for second line

TAKEAWAY: Be direct

If a flight is canceled, the passenger needs to know right away. It’s better to get straight to the point, so as to minimize aggravation. So I’ve mentioned the flight to Chicago to clearly differentiate it with the Los Angeles flight and not confuse the user. I used a button because the situation demands an urgent action. The passenger can act on the task from the notification itself without opening the activity. With ‘now’ there is an urgency for the user to act swiftly, as time is a constraint here.

SCENARIO

A user’s account was signed into a device that has not been previously used to sign into the account. The device location is on and shows Palm Springs, California. This happened at 10:34 p.m. The user can go into their account to review their device access and make changes at any time, or they can call the company. The user has 2-factor authentication set up on this account.

30 characters for the first line 

40 characters for second line

TAKEAWAY: SHOW YOU CARE

I used ‘alert’ in the title to let the user know that the company cares for his privacy and treats it seriously. Mentioning that the sign in happened ‘just now’ shows that the company is proactive in ensuring the user’s safety. I’ve used a button to guide the user to an action in case of any wrongdoing. Else, he can ignore it.

SCENARIO

A user’s reservation was changed to a later time, and now they need to confirm whether they will be able to make the new time. They can change the reservation up to 2 days before the date of the reservation.

30 characters for the first line 

40 characters for second line

TAKEAWAY: GIVE ALL THE RELEVANT DETAILS

Travel delays can be frustrating, and a passenger needs to know the crucial details immediately. I opted for straight-forwardness and gave all the relevant details to the passenger at once, to avoid panic and to put him at ease to encourage necessary action.

SCENARIO

There’s a new shop that just opened up on the user’s street. It’s an ice cream store. The user has explicitly noted in our app’s food preferences that they love ice cream. The place is having a sale this Saturday on chocolate chip mint ice cream.

30 characters for the first line 

40 characters for second line

TAKEAWAY: USE IMMEDIATE RECOGNITION

Instead of saying ice cream shop ‘near you’, I mentioned the user’s street for immediate recognition and action. I frontloaded the copy by talking about the sale. I further chose an ice cream emoji to set a lighter tone that matches the subject.

Error Messages for Mobile

Scenario

There are no messages in an inbox the user has visited for the first time.

RATIONALE

I’ve used the empty state as an opportunity to show the first-time users the feature’s potential and motivated them to start using it. Have tried to give an interesting and persuasive sales dialog. With the button, I’ve directed the users to the relevant how-to. 

SCENARIO

The user is trying to view a webpage, but the content can’t load without the user’s location.

RAtionale

It’s difficult to avoid the nosiness of asking for someone’s location. But users are more likely to share it if they trust us. So I opted for clarity and provided a reason for why we are asking for it.

SCENARIO

The user can’t change their profile information until they verify their identity via a code by text or email.

RAtionale

I’ve opted for a personal touch to lighten the hassle of verifying oneself in the midst of another task. The detailed buttons make the verification relatively easier for the user.